Loop de Loop at the Morris Arboretum

Last week I took a trip with a friend to the Morris Arboretum (free admission for Penn students!). There, we saw a new sculpture created by artist Patrick Dougherty. Build over the course of three weeks in March this year, Loop de Loop is made up of sticks and saplings wound and woven together. The…

Math in Nature and Art

1.618033988749894848204586834365638117720309179805762862135448622705260462818902449707207204189391137484754088075386891752126633862223536931793180060766726354433389086595939582905638322661319928… This is the golden ratio, or part of it at least. Commonly believed in art to be a very aesthetically pleasing proportion, it has a close relationship with the Fibonacci sequence. From the fibonacci sequence, it can be calculated by taking the limit of the ratio of consecutive Fibonacci numbers (i.e. lim{n -> inf}…

Food Photography Tricks

We’ve all had those moments where we see a photo or advertisement for food that looks so amazing, we want to immediately go and find it somewhere. I know I have. What consistently surprises me, though (dough?), are all the creative ways that food stylists make the product look 10 times better than what we…

New Mexico: A Hidden Gem

Over spring break, I visited New Mexico with two other friends almost entirely for the reason that we had nowhere else to go. The trip, however, ended up being really fun and we found Santa Fe to be an amazing location for art and creativity. The area has long been a source of inspiration for…

Mardi Gras and it’s Elaborate Floats

Mardi Gras is approaching on Tuesday, March 5th. Literally, “Fat Tuesday”, Mardi Gras’s name refers to the tradition of gross overeating of rich foods before the fasting of Lent begins. Celebrations around the world host huge parades full of elaborate floats. Some are enchanting and beautiful while others are funny and humorous. Krewes work on…

Mimetic Architecture

Mimetic buildings are designed to look like what they function as/for. The trend became popular in the US in the mid-20th century as a form of easily seen and understandable advertising. For example, diners and restaurants shaped like burgers, coffee cups, and donuts attracted customers for exactly what the building looks like: burgers, coffee, and…

Rosha Yaghmai: Exploring Alienation through Sculpture

The world of sculpture is quickly seeing a great upcoming of female artists. One of these inspiring women is Rosha Yaghmai. An MFA graduate of the California Institute of Art, Yaghmai explores themes of alienation and transformation. Yaghmai was originally a photographer, who, after beginning to experiment with manipulating photographs and bringing them out of…

Dominic Wilcox: Champion of Strange Inventions

Born in the UK, Wilcox has dedicated his life to creating unusual, but thought-provoking objects. He studied at The Royal College of Art and graduated in 2002. Since then, he has exhibited his work around the world and created commissioned works for numerous big name brands, such as Kelloggs and BMW. One of his displays…

Dansaekhwa: The Trend of Monochrome Art in South Korea

Following Korea’s independence from Japan in 1945 and the end of the Korean war that resulted in the separation of North and South Korea, South Koreans were left with a new political and social system. Emerging artists during this time sought to communicate their conflicts through new styles of art and expression. Among these new…

2nd Annual Animation First Festival Celebrates French Animation

The French Institute Alliance Française (FIAF) will be celebrating its second annual Animation First Festival in New York City from Friday, January 25 to Sunday, January 27. Showcasing a variety of French animation and other forms of media, the festival explores the extensive history of French animation. In addition to 17 premieres, the line-up includes…